How to fill in the Factsheet Template for Seed Identification Guide (SIG)

General Instructions:

  • Use plain English words as much as you can, considering end-users who may or may not have botany training or are an international audience.
  • Please use standard terminologies for feature descriptions in the glossary of SIG or description charts for shape, surface texture, and colour.
  • Describe the features on dispersal units that would be considered typical for the species, i.e. mature, intact, and exhibiting identifying features, but include observations on the range of natural variation.
  • The template sections are mandatory when labeled with an asterisk “*”

Template section explanation and examples:

*Scientific Name: names of Family, Genus, Species, and Author

Using the current name from a reliable and reputable naming source: e.g.,

The Plant List (http://www. theplantlist.org/ )

Example:

Solanum carolinense L. (pop up for genus, species, and author)

Solanaceae (pop up for family name)

Synonym(s)

Optional, if synonyms add value for end-users, e.g., newly changed names

Example:

Common Name(s):

Optional, if the common name(s) adds value or convenience for end-users. Language associated with the common name must be indicated.

Example:

horse-nettle (English)

morelle de la Caroline (French)

Regulation:

This field is for “Index Keywords”, which will aid in indexing, searching, or sorting. It could be regulatory importance, special usages for stakeholders such as sponsors’ or partners’ needs.

Example: Canadian Weed Seeds Order

Accreditation:

This field is for “Index Keywords”, which will aid in indexing, searching, or sorting.  It could be “Accreditation” importance, special usages for stakeholders such as sponsors’ or partners’ needs.

Example: Registered Seed Technology (RST) (https://www.analyzeseeds.com/)

*Distribution:  

Described species distribution information of the native or naturalized locations with references.

Examples: Native to eastern North America, from Ontario to northern Mexico, and introduced in Japan and India (Bassett and Munro 1986, USDA-ARS 2016).